Mulattea is a blog written by Skye Haynes. Her posts explore mixed identity, feminism, race, religion, and privilege.

Mixed Media: Interracial Relationships that Changed History

Mixed Media: Interracial Relationships that Changed History

Everybody should know their history. Otherwise, how do you know where you've been? Or where you're going? Mixed people are no exception.

Every mixed person's origin can be traced to an interracial couple. At some point in our history, one person liked another person who was not like them. They paid no attention to stereotypes. They looked past privileges. They embraced the person within without discarding the exterior.

In the words of Chance the Rapper, "That's love."

So, as a sort of interracial couple celebration, this Mixed Media is dedicated to just a few interracial couples that were extraordinary. (Although let's be honest, they all are)

These couples put their love above the law. Above stereotypes. Above privilege. Above ignorant people.

This article was written for PBS and delves into the stories of *sucks in air* Ruth Williams Khama and Sir Seretse Khama, Mildred and Richard Loving, Arcadio Huang and Marie-Claude Regnier, Gonzalo Guerrero and Zazil Ha, Louisa and Louis Gregory, Leonard Kip Rhinelander and Alice Jones, James Achilles Kirkpatrick and Khair un-Nissa, and FINALLY Bill de Blasio and Chirlane McCray.

What a mouthful.

Click here for a link to the article!

Just a warning, though, not all of these couples were perfect. In fact, none of them were. Some of them were controversial, others divorced because their families couldn't take it. And that's just real.

Anywho, that's all there is for today. You know Mixed Media posts are usually pretty short. If you're still looking for something to read though, we've got a lot more Mixed Media posts (just click the link at the top) and you can check out the lastest article on Why Representation Matters here.

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Why Representation Matters

Why Representation Matters